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20130318
20130326
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half the city but that government forces were advancing. >> (translated): the day before yesterday, there was increased artillery shelling and shooting of mortars and mig planes attacked. we've retreated to create a second defensive line so we can counterattack. >> narrator: abu bakri never expected to be a rebel commander. >> (translated): i finished compulsory military service in 2006, and by allah's grace went on to study economics at the university of aleppo. that was me until the revolution started. >> takbir. >> allahu akbar. >> takbir. >> allahu akbar. >> narrator: ghaith continued his journey into aleppo. abu bakri said god willing he'd see him on the front line in two days. >> we are being smuggled into aleppo by rebels and activists. we're taking a long route through side streets, through residential ighborhoods and through villages, anit's a very complicated process. we have scouts moving ahead of us. we crossed a couple of the streets, and then we started hearing the bullets, the shelling, the machine gun fire. (machine gun fire) (explosion) >> narrator: ghaith reached
. >> officials plan to compile new strategies within a year to minimize possible damages. >>> japanese government officials say north korea has violated united nations trade sanctions. they filed a report with the united nations accusing the country of exporting nuclear related materials. japanese customs officials found aluminum alloy rods last august on a cargo ship docked in tokyo. the vessel had come from north korea via the chinese city of dalian. the japanese government introduced legislation three years ago allowing customs agents to inspect suspicious cargo from north korea. experts concluded that the aluminum rods could be used as parts for centrifuges in a nuclear facility. this violates a u.n. security council resolution that bans north korea from trading in nuclear-related materials. japanese officials have ordered the storage company to hand over the cargo. >>> it took two months of negotiations but he's been sworn in. they will lead a block that support jewish settlements. no party was able to capture in january. netanyahu entered into negotiations to form his coalition. lawmakers a
with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: today's supreme court arguments pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registrati
a government shutdown, we update the short- and long-term budget battles. >> sreenivasan: paul solman looks at free trade through the eyes of a classic american brand, getting wet in the global market. >> i know that every surfboard that comes into america comes in duty free. and when i sell a surfboard to australia, japan, europe, its a 20% to 25% duty that they have to pay to get mine. >> brown: we continue our series on how broadband technoly is changing our lives. tonight, a look at chattanooga, tennessee-- home of the nation's fastest internet connections. >> sreenivasan: and, spencer michaels has the story of photo journalists who risked their lives to tell the stories of iraqis in the early days of the war. >> as photographers, we're always looking for ways to communicate the urgency of horrible drama in these situations. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, a
by the japanese government owns the remaining 40%. about 2,400 people work here around the clock. engineers from pakistan and bangladesh work with colleagues from malaysia, japan and iraq. >> japanese count. all right. eight count, please. all right. >> reporter: every morning, workers exercise before heading to the construction site. it's an idea implemented by the japanese employees to foster a sense of community among workers with different languages and cultures. kazuhiro ouwai from japan oversees the on-site work flow. he instructs the workers on safety procedures. they speak to each other in english, but all have different accents. communication often takes time. >> what? >> projection. >> protection? >> projection. >> translator: one of my priorities is to make sure no one is hurt here. safety is very important for us. >> reporter: officials from the joint venture have also started on-site vocational training. instructors teach six subjects, including english and i.t. skills. so far, 340 people have participated. some have started working at the site. >> translator: i want to study englis
. >> and we have the stumbling blocks in the deal to sequester the government spending cuts but first the look at how the overseas markets fair fared today. >>> on wall street, more red than green in the stock market and some losses in the oil patch as well. >> that's where we begin our market outlook tonight. the company's ceo expects negative pricing press neuer several airs. looking at the stocks, dn almost 4 percent. other drillers almost got hit. neighbors and hall burton down as well. leading the s&p gainers today. jcpenney the retailer got a positive report from an analyst at oppenheimer because of the new joe fresh shot. but says pennies needs to work through its problems. >>as ttrazenika reported a big drop. and forecast continuing difficulties with competition from generic drugs. shared traded in new york were down slightly at 46.18. >> and after six year on the job, electronic arts ceo offered his resignation during the tenure. the stock dropped more than 60 percent. he said in a memo revenues will be at the low end of his earlr guidance and was accountable for it. shares were down
theacts before me, that we know the syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. we know that there are those in the syrian government who have expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons if necessary to protect themselves. i am deeply skeptical of any claim that in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. the broader point is, is that once we establish the facts, i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. >> warner: both leaders spoke extensively about iran and about the different timetables the countries are on for possible military action to prevent an iranian nuclear weapon. mr. obama said he thinks there is still time for diplomacy but added: >> each country has to make its own decisions when it comes to the awesome decision to engage in any kind of military action. and israel is differently situated than the united states, and i would not expect that the prime minister would make a decision about his country's security and defer that to any other country, any more than the united states would defer our de
with hank greenberg and the a.i.g. story and why he is suing the government on behalf of the stockholders after the government bailed out a.i.g. and paid back the money with interest. >> the fact had to come out what really happened. the so-called accounting scandal turned out toe virally nothing. the corporate governance of the united states changed after enron. boards became more critical of almost anything that everybody was doing but i wanted -- more importantly i wanted the 92,000 people that helped build a.i.g. and all the things they did to make it the greatest insurance company in history. that story had to be told on their behalf as well. >> rose: a president's visit and the story of hank greenberg when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama will travel to the mile east this week. it will be his first time visiting since he entered the white house four years ago. he will meet newly reelected prime minister benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem on wednesday. the president has often been c
the syrian government has the capacity to carry out chemical weapon attacks. we know that there are those there the syrian government who have compressed a willingnesso e-- expressed a willingness to use chemical weapons if necessary, to protect themselves. i am deeply skeptical of any claim that in fact it was the opposition that used chemical weapons. everybody who knows the facts of the chemical weapon stockpiles inside of syria as well as the syrian government's capabilities i think would question those claims, but i know that they're floating o there right now. the broader point is that once we establish the facts, i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. >> rose: joining me from washington, michigan congressman mike rogers, he is the chairman of the house intelligence committee. i am pleased to have him on this program. welcome. >> charlie, thanks for having me. >> rose: what is it that caused you to say, you know, there's a probability? >> well, there is a growing body of reporting for really about 18 mont out what we believe the syrian intention is, th
by the intelligence agencies of governments who did not support my decision to remove saddam and it is true that much of the intelligence turned out to be wrong. >> warner: a report released this month put the cost of iraq's reconstruction at more than $60 billion so far. that on top of 1.7 trillion in estimated war costs according to a recent study by brown university. today some baghdad residents spoke of little progress and expressed anger at the united states. >> the americans did not do anything when they came to iraq. they granted freedom to iraq? what freedom are they talking about? >> warner: in washington, president obama issued a statement marking the anniversary saying he joined in paying tribute to all who served and sacrificed in one of our tion's longest wars. earlier i spoke to jane arraf a reporter earlier, i spoke to jane arraf, a reporter for al-jazeera english and the christian science monitor, about today's violence in baghdad and life in post-war iraq. welcome jane. what is known about who or what's behind today's car bombings and suicide attacks? >> well, the finger, judy, is al
is this new tone going to be translated into the hard work of actually governing the church? there, of course, the challenges are considerably more steep >> ifill: we continue our series of stories about the middle east, margaret warner reports on the divide among the two leading palestinian factions, and its impact on the quest for peace. . >> it is really a divide over power. who's goi toontl what and what's going to be in a stronger position to win the palestinian people and who's going to have the narrative on its side? >> woodruff: and we examine a dramatic shift in public opinion with a majority of americans supporting same sex marriage. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated the idethaall peopleeserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
networks to their normal status and find out what caused the outages. government officials in seoul have dealt with several cyber attacks in the past. they overloaded websites with mass iive amounts of data in ju 2009. they confirmed for the first time a cyber attack by north korea. in march 2011 hackers blocked access to the website of the office of the south korean president and other government agencies. they traced the take to a north korean government agency in china. two months later another agency halted atm services at a south korean bank. professor kim jong un says the latest cyber attack is different from those in the past. >> translator: many private firms use shared servers. workers for these companies use the same programs in the same computer systems to nd out emails and access data. if hackers infect such a shared server with a computer virus, all the firms using the same server will be affected. i think this is what happened today. i think it was an organized crime. because the perpetrators were familiar with our schedule. they aimed for 2:00, when banks carry out most of
think he just might. that question was never posein the u.s. government or the cia, despite very smart people theyci have there. >> rose: then they launched thele invasion, and was immediately successful.an saddam went into hiding.dd what happened in the days after that, that made, for most of us looking at it, and for most analysts-- and you included -- serious mistakes?ys >> well, i was there for that part-- this enterprise as an embeddd correspondent, both in the command and on the ground.on and the expectation was-- theth americans essentially fought last war. they fought the 2003 war as if it was an extension of the 1991x war. they thought you defeat the republican guard pup go to-- you defeat kind of the conventionali forces. and then war is done, and we're finish people say there wasn't a plan. there was a plan. itas to hand over as quicklyan as possibleo t iraqis themselves to take out driver, put in some new drivers into the vehicle, and let it go down the road. >> rose: that was rumsfeld's theory. >> it was also condi rice's. the institution would hold, we put new people in a
'll do is try to extend the banking holiday through the weekend. that's going to give the government, they hope, time to recapitalize the bank. that's a long-winded way to say pitch the bank. put a lot more money in them so they are stronger. not until tuesday because it happens to be a holiday. >> michelle, this is suzie.hat do you think could happen on tuesday? there's been so much pent-up anxiety, what happens when those banks open? >> well, it all depends on what happens over the next four days. so cyprus rejeblcted the first idea and they try to raid a pension fund to come up with money to meet the requirements of the bail out from the european partners. now that all of those things have happened, they face two choices. they need to shut down some banks that are very, very weak. or they're going to have to leave the euro. that's t choice they face. and depending on which one they make, that's what's going to happen on tuesday. >> michelle, how did the banks in cyprus get so bloody. is it really traceable basically to the fact that it's a kind of "don't ask, don't tell" kind of b
profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, malaysia. so it is not so much a risk on/risk off. if i can jump off an earlier point which is fantastic which is the expansion we see the fundamentals have not changed a lot. that allows us to be a little more flat until the end of the year. sentiment is a very powerful thing. sentiment as momentum picks up people become more confident and like stocks that can be rather strong. we are looking at that right now. so bonds are being sold to finance equities that would change the dynamic and we have to revisit our estimates. >> thanks so much. >> thank you. >>> and coming up we will get more specific and find out which stocks this week's market monitor likes. >>> more warnings
signs of vitality. here in japan the japanese government beginning steps to implement major changes after decades of inflation. concerns are coming from europe and affecting global markets. let's see how we're opening up here. the markets this time yesterday got a big boost. we did see the euro surge. the relief seems to be short lived as we're seeing in the opening lels. the rescue deal for cyprus could serve as a template for other european countries with strug e struggling banks. that comment really heightens some of the worries in global markets that the deal that was made may result in more problems down the road. now a bit of a negative reaction here in tokyo. we also might see which is a bit of a worry is a return to safer assets by investors including the yen. >> many investors watching the yen's movement. the japanese currency has been on a major weakening trend. where do we stand this tuesday morning? >> that's a big focus. you mentioned the moves by prime minister abe. let's look at some of the currency levels here and the pairs today. we've seen some volatility with the
today the cyprusian government is sparking concern throughout the region. joining me is andrew ross sorkin of the "new york times" and francesco guerrera for financil economic. simon i'll win good you. what's going on. >> well the explanation part is that a number of cyprian banks gambled and lost in a big way on greek debt. they facing big losses and these banks are big relative to the economy. the economy needs financial assistance from the outside from the european union and i'm afraid the people running the ow presumably th rmanin the first instance have decided greek depositors should take a hit. the way that played out at least over the weekend was all depositors would take a hit of some kind no matter how small their deposit. it sales to be now an attempt to back away from that and focus on people with deposits over 100,000 euros targeting in part russians who hold a large amounts of money, claims on those cyprian banks. >> rose: when that happened what was the talk in the financial community cing you com a couple quotes one from dennis gotman the binging has been shaken to
was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president i saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment buthen he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership of israel to say to them, you need to push your leaders to take risks at peace. >> rose: basically saying you have to make sacrifices on settlements and other issues in order to get some kind of agreement
overwhelmingly embracedger netwo generic drugs over brand names, but the government is asking the supreme court to consider whether consumers have been cheated out of even more savings by so-called pay for delay drug patent deals that keep drugs from coming to market sooner. the case involved the drug androjel. the drug's distributor struck a deal with watson pharmaceutical in 2006, which keeps the generic off shelves until 2015 in exchange for a fee. the industry contends in reaching some settlements for drugs like lipitor, consumers have benefitted. >> lipitor is coming to the market five years before the expiration of the patent, saving $4.5 billion per year. this is one of many patent settlements that involved some kind of consideration that saved consumers and the federal government billions of dollars. >> reporter: aarp and the ama argue settlements allowing big pharma companies which pay companies to wait, undermine abilities for doctors to give cost-effective prescriptions to patients. analysts from deerfield institute found generics lost 52% of them. armen . >> these deals have been st
in the election and is now in the government said we don't need-- a second palestinian state. hat isn't new thinking. and heaid ver pointedly, people can't be occupiers in their own land. in order, he was rejecting the ideaçó that israelis don't have the right to live anywhere they want in the entire territory. today i talked to ashwari, a palestinian very prominent, still member of the p.l.o. executive committee and she said we don't need new language and thinking we need new will and courage by the united states and palestinians were widespread in their disappointment with the trip because they felt that the president had really embraced the israeli kind of view of this conflict, and had not expressed a willingness to press for some free zone settlement. it does not mean something may not happen. but you could see that new thinking is going to come hard in this region of a very old conflict. >> margaret warner, thank you very much, joining us from amman. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": chicago's plans to shutter public schools; the growing gap on how internet access is being
. the government is hoping this defeat will give them leverage to negotiate new terms with the european union so when parliament meets again on thursday they might have a better plan to vote on. it a high-stakes game of chicken with each side wondering who's going to blink first. or in this case, whether the banks will run out of money before a deal is reached. if the eu does not back down then savers in cyprus will have to shoulder some of the burden for the bailout loan. and that has savers around the world wondering whether their deposits are safe. in cyprus tonight, banks remain closed with no clear indication when they'll reopen. one analyst from jpmorgan tonight saying cyprus has chosen a hard road. global markets are wondering where it's going to end. >> bertha, thank you very much for that report. when those banks reopen it is going to be a very interesting and busy day. bertha coombs, thank you. >>> that uncertainty in cyprus sent the u.s. stock markets on a meandering hike today. the major averages began the session higher, following more good news about the u.s. housing market. but th
troubles in cyprus where the government is trying to come up with a plan to reorganize its banks by monday. that's the deadline set by the european union officials. if they don't, it could mean collapse of the entire banking sector. as michelle caruso-cabrera tells us, that fear is being felt on the streets. >> reporter: cyprus yet another country in europe where the devastation from the financial crisis is being felt throughout the population. throughout cyprus lines could be seen at the atms of the country's weakest bank, people desperate to take out cash because they're on the verge of failure. >> we're being treated like third-class citizens and we're very, very angry. >> reporter: how much money did you take out? >> i just took $1,000. i've been taking $1,000 every day. and personally, i'm taking this money and cash with me to the u.k. tonight. >> reporter: because? >> because we don't know what the future of our country holds. >> reporter: the reason they're using the atm? the banks have been closed nearly a week and won't open until tuesday, earliest. business owners deeply affected
that jesus is god, you don't mean he's like the governing entity over this universe, correct? >> no. i mean -- >> he is one and the same with that entity. >> that's right. that he represents the human aspect of god. that he is god become human. i think myself that is a good way to understand what is going on within the new testament. however, what i believe is also important is that one can study jesus and understand his disciples, no matter what one's particular faith about those people. they remain people. >> can you summarize the true contribution of mary magdalene to catholicism and christianity. >> mary magdalene contributed basic sacraments to christianity which have largely been forgotten. there is dissolving evil within the human heart, second was anointing for healing. the third is vision. that is an awareness of god's eternal presence. >> catholic church canonized her. >> she is a saint of all churches. >> relationship with jesus. discipleship lasted for 11 ye
, when he was in argentina, he did enough to stand up to a very oppressive, cruel government. is that going anywhere? >> you know, who knows what may come out. certainly there have been questions, there have been questions for a long time now about that. people say he at the very least didn't stand up as much as he could have. there were some suggestions that maybe he in some way created or enabled some of the persecution but those seem to, other people have come out and said no that's not the case. >> and very quickly, many people hope for what they call evangelization in this papacy. quickly, what does that mean? >> well for catholics they would like to see their faith spread. and so whether you're talking moderate and liberal catholics hope that francis's emphasis on issues like the environment and the poor, things that have always been important to the church but maybe not emphasized, maybe that will appeal to some people. conservatives hope that his pastoral demeanor, his clear love of god, of jesus, that maybe that will be appealing and help bring catholics back to the
not think we need to started here. >> good news, the government will not shut down, not at least until the end of september. >> i think we need to give credit to senator barbara mikulski on this. she negotiated a great deal in the senate and also the house. she has come through as a top- notch legislator. that said, bigger problems are ahead of us. >> the 8% of defense will kick in, so there will be furloughs. >> they have delayed the furloughs because of the continuing resolution. >> that is a good point because 28% of all federal hires are we talk about how much we revere and respect and admire veterans. they are the ones that will get laid off. >> the republicans are lucky that the ryan plan does not have a chance. if the american people got wind of the kind of cuts that would happen under this budget, and most people do not pay attention to this back-and-forth, but it started to happen, they would not like it at all. you can see that in all the data. >> i hate to be critical of you -- actually, i do not really. but you missed the story on the budget. the real news is the senate off
are so takes vicious cycle and i think we as a culture, not just the government need to say marriage is important, children having a mom and dad is important and yes it makes a difference in their lives. >> that's true that we need to, you know, encourage people to get married and have kids within a marriage relationship so they can have two parents at home. that's the best structure. but the fact is it's very, very difficult for many of these women in the communities that they leave to live in that environment, and obviously the data is showing that is not an option. >> so what is -- what is something that really can be done about it? because i agree with genevieve about telling people they should get mered but nobody is listening. >> and i tell you i was a single mom, i am a single mom, and my kids were young and it took me a long time to find a partner but in the meantime i thought i need to be in the community, i cannot do this alone. and i built a community of male friends so my kids were exposed to everything so i think we need to think about creatively about how to raise these
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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